Inertia friction welding

Inertia friction welding

MTU uses a variety of joining processes which are specifically tailored to the requirements of engine construction. One of these is inertia, or rotational, friction welding, which – strictly speaking – is not a welding process but rather a hot forging technique to join two parts.

Operating principle of inertia friction welding

During inertia friction welding, one of the parts is clamped in position on a rotating spindle while the other is mounted opposite it on the tailstock. The spindle, with the component, fixture and flywheel on it is accelerated to a certain speed, forming the centrifugal mass. As soon as it has attained the necessary rotational energy, the two parts are pressed together at a defined upsetting pressure. The rotational energy, through friction, is turned into heat. After the flywheel has come to rest, the forging pressure on the parts is maintained until the two members have perfectly united.